Online books on sexual harassment


13-Jun-2016 04:20

Help with reading books -- Report a bad link -- Suggest a new listing Home -- Search -- New Listings -- Authors -- Titles -- Subjects -- Serials Books -- News -- Features -- Archives -- The Inside Story Edited by John Mark Ockerbloom ([email protected])OBP copyright and licenses., a daily update designed to help collection development and readers’ advisory librarians navigate the never-ending wave of new books and book news.In the civil court, victims of these kinds of cyber attacks, from stalking to revenge porn to online bullying, can sue their harassers through something called tort law, otherwise known as civil wrongs.There, victims can claim the torts of defamation, intentional infliction of emotional distress, harassment, and public disclosure of private fact, said Citron, depending on the specifics of the case.

Most recently, Jennifer Lawrence told When our digital space is invaded with sexual harassment, violent messages, and threats; when our private data, information, and photographs are exposed, it feels like it should be against the law. It is a sex crime,” Jennifer Lawrence told after her photos were leaked. Unfortunately, many of them are costly and invasive, and combined with a lack of education and precedent, these channels don’t always offer the justice people are seeking.“Often, it’s a perfect storm of all these things,” she said.When this happens to a victim, they can take their complaint to one of the justice system’s two worlds: criminal or civil.Here you will find highlights of titles moving in the marketplace and getting buzz, bookish stories making news, and key items from the literary web.

takes their vital work onward, continuing to nurture a community of librarians learning from and supporting each other and providing resources that help us excel at our jobs. That story, with its twist on both media and publishing, follows the many that have come to light in the industry over the last several months.The law is notoriously slow to adapt to technology, but legal scholars say that if done right, the law can be used as a tool to stop this behavior.